Workshop Descriptions


#ImmigrantWomenToo: How Domestic Violence Intersects with Asylum Protection

Presenter(s): Christine Lin & Kate Jastram

For decades, asylum protection has been a cornerstone of U.S. immigration law yet recent legal developments attempt to erode protections for domestic violence survivors who seek refuge in the United States. This workshop will provide an overview on the current state of U.S. immigration policies seeking to limit due process rights and protections for asylum seekers and non-citizens, highlighting the impact on individuals fleeing domestic violence in their countries of origin. For many non-citizen survivors of domestic violence, asylum may be the only form of immigration protection in the United States. This workshop focuses on asylum protection and will not cover U, T visas, VAWA, or other immigration relief unrelated to fear of return to one's country of origin. It will equip domestic violence advocates with the necessary tools to screen for asylum eligibility as a potential form of immigration relief and make appropriate referrals. No background in law or immigration is required.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Our Work in the Margins: Now More than EVER!

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Accessing Compensation for Victims of Domestic Violence

Presenter(s): Christie Munson & Robin Foemmel Bie

As the nation's first victim compensation program, CalVCB strives to be a leader in the development and administration of victim compensation. CalVCB works to identify and address barriers that hinder victims' access to compensation.

This workshop will address:
An overview of the CalVCB program, including potential roadblocks identified by those working directly with victims and what can be done to overcome them
Changes within our organization to provide trauma-informed services
How our mental health benefits are utilized by families affected by domestic violence
Our upcoming online access system, which will be transformative in how victims apply for and access compensation
An overview of the work done by Trauma Recovery Centers throughout California, and how they are working within communities to help victims

As a vital resource for victims of crime, CalVCB strives to maximize access and reach more victims.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Holistic Services: Quality of Life and Well Being for Survivors

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Beyond Halal and Haram: Muslims, Sex, and Relationships

Presenter(s): Anisa Ali

There are few resources for American Muslims related to sex and relationships, and some American Muslims may encounter cultural barriers that prevent them from discussing these issues with family and community members. High levels of discrimination against Muslims and Islamophobia also propel the need for more understanding about how to provide trauma-informed, developmentally appropriate, and culturally-responsive violence prevention services to this diverse community. Health centers and community-based settings play a crucial role in reaching high school and college-aged American Muslims with messages about healthy and unhealthy relationships. This workshop will describe an evidence-informed universal education intervention on relationships and its impact on health. This intervention features a new safety card specific to American Muslims, with information on healthy relationships and sex, resources for support, and cultural and religious factors that play into decision-making.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Our Work in the Margins: Now More than EVER!

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Centering Racial Equity into our Work: learnings from a shared journey.

Presenter(s): Heidi Notario & Arlene Vassell

Two years ago, the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) embarked on a journey to become an anti-racist organization, focused on embracing institutional practices that reduce disparities and promote racial equity. Early on this journey, NRCDV recognized that a deep understanding and intentional work to dismantle racism are key issues to prioritize in the work to end gender-based violence (GBV) but we needed to start with ourselves and our own organization. Without changing our own structures and practices, as well as creating the space for personal work, we realized that becoming an anti-racist organization was an unattainable goal. Presenters will share a roadmap of the racial equity work that NRCDV is engaged in, hoping that it will be helpful to those starting or already on this journey. Additionally, presenters will highlight the importance of developing intervention and prevention strategies, alongside key organizational practices, to respond to GBV.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Transforming and Leveling Power Differentials

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Changing to the Equity Lens: Steps Domestic Violence Organizations Can Take

Presenter(s): Nilda Valmores & Laura Sunday

How can our dv organizations change their approach to helping survivors and their communities? Learn what a group of diverse dv reps from across California identified as 11 practical steps that dv orgs can take to shift the lens in their work and transform their approaches. Share and learn what other steps dv orgs might be taking to be accountable and effective working with survivors, families, and underserved communities. This workshop is targeted for those that aren't afraid to make change.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Disrupting the Organizational Status Quo

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm


Confidentiality and Mandated Reporting: A Comprehensive Tool-Kit

Presenter(s): Jennafer Wagner & Sam Tuttle

Understanding and implementing confidentiality and mandated reporting requirements is a key component to being accountable to survivors, families, and communities served by domestic violence agencies and advocates."Confidentiality and Mandated Reporting: A Comprehensive Tool-Kit for DV Advocates and Agencies" will introduce the full tool-kit, discuss how the written materials and on-line resources can be accessed and used, and present the opportunity for advanced discussions of the nuanced policy decision making that will go into using the tool-kit materials to create or update agency confidentiality and mandated reporting policies and practices. We hope to engender in-depth discussions among workshop participants about their own experiences, questions, and concerns raised when implementing policies that fulfill the goal of being accountable to those they serve.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Disrupting the Organizational Status Quo

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Confront without Shaming; Support without Colluding

Presenter(s): Kendall Evans

In most families where there is abuse and violence, the survivors do not want to break up the family. They want the person who abusive and violent to stop, and be the loving, productive person they can be. Even in cases where the survivors do want separation, if there are children, there is usually still going to be contact. There sometimes has to be legal consequences to get a person who is abusive to step back and become self-aware and "own" their own behavior and its consequences. Nevertheless, we need interventions that do not demonize or ostracize people who are abusive, but maximize the opportunities for them to change - while supporting everyone's safety. People who are abusive are more likely to change in the context of a caring, empathic connection with a helper who invites them to cope without hurting others. There is good evidence to believe that people who are abusive learned to be abusive by being abused. Hurting people hurt people. Healing people heal people.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Shining Light on Quiet Domestic Violence Narratives

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Courageous Conversations: A Journey Toward Racial Equity

Presenter(s): Hend Saadeh & Cristal Baez

Since 2013, Haven Women's Center of Stanislaus (Haven) has been on a journey to transform supportive services to be more culturally responsive through an equitable approach. In late 2016, our organization distributed the CROS (Cultural Responsiveness Organizational Self-Assessment) provided by the Partnership in order to help us understand our strengths and weaknesses around cultural responsiveness. Soon after, we were awarded a grant of $20,000 to support us in developing more culturally responsive services. Our intention was to address the following questions: What is preventing communities and people from reaching their full potential? Can full potential be reached if obstacles remain invisible? What can be done to begin to see something not many are ready to see? During this workshop, we will explore Haven's journey through the process of answering these questions.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Transforming and Leveling Power Differentials

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Creating Space for Women of Color: A Facilitated Conversation for White Women

Presenter(s): Alejandra Aguilar & Danielle Lingle

This workshop is for White women who are interested in joining a critical conversation to address ways in which they can improve their understanding of what it means to be a White aspiring ally and how to live out their allyship by creating space for women of color (WOC). Participants must be open to difficult and uncomfortable discussions in an effort to learn ways in which they can 1) acknowledge their White privilege, 2) learn to listen from a space of allyship, 3) recognize when and how to speak up and stand up in solidarity with WOC, and 4) discuss ways in which they can use their privilege to create change, address intersectionality, support WOC leadership, and contribute to racial and gender justice, within their organizations and beyond. In an effort to make the most of this space and time, and out of respect to the participants, the workshop door will close to new attendees 15 minutes after start.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Transforming and Leveling Power Differentials

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Discomfort of Change: Organizational Accountability as Prevention

Presenter(s): Liat Wexler

Intersectionality. Centering the most marginalized. Diversity, equity, & inclusion. Many of us may understand how these concepts apply to the people we serve, but feel ill-equipped to bring it into our own organizations. Deep systemic change that ends violence and harm, at both an organizational & societal level, requires us to turn the lens to our own practices. Do our staff and leadership reflect our communities? How do we run our meetings? What expectations do we have for "professionalism"? What are we doing that disempowers our front-line staff? How are decisions made? This workshop will offer a brave space to embrace the discomfort that comes with being truly accountable to those who are most marginalized, and most harmed. Leaders, directors, and decision-makers are especially encouraged to attend.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Disrupting the Organizational Status Quo

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Evolution of Boy: From Survivor to Abuser, A Story Of Responsibility & Becoming a Healer

Presenter(s): Dominique Waltower

My presentation consists of 4 areas
1. Being a childhood victim of DV
2. Becoming abusive as an adult
3. The process of change accountability and healing
4. Advocacy

I discuss each segment for about 15 minutes after which the audience gets into groups to discuss the feelings and options of the 3 family members I present in each segment. The purpose is to dialogue about the experience of each person the DV is affecting.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Shining Light on Quiet Domestic Violence Narratives

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Family Business: Unpacking the Silence of Black Victims of Intimate Partner

Presenter(s): Antoinette Schrader

This workshop will look at the African American community's current use of domestic violence services and next steps for inclusive programs. In an effort to further expand this topic, this workshop will also look at intersectionality and further delve into other populations within the African American community where we as a movement have missed the mark and how we can begin to implement changes on every level to increase the utilization, evaluation, and outcomes for the services we provide.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Our Work in the Margins: Now More than EVER!

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Gentlemen Respecting & Interacting In Truth (G.R.I.T.) Black Masculinity

Presenter(s): Corey Ingram

This presentation provides an overview of healthy masculinity from the viewpoint of men of color, and focuses on dominant stories, the history of race and rape, and strategies to engage men of color. The intersectionality of race and interpersonal violence creates an interesting dichotomy of perceptions surrounding men of color especially in American culture (e.g. "the boogeyman"). Men of color are often portrayed as perpetrators of interpersonal violence; however, research has shown that white, middle class males represent the majority of offenders. Therefore men of color should be seen as potential allies. Some ways to deconstruct these misconceptions is by educating all individuals on social norms and engaging men of color in the discussion of interpersonal violence, healthy masculinity, and male programming. A major tenet of G.R.I.T. is that "We all are equally invested and engaged in the future, betterment, and success of this society".

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Working Upstream: The Many Facets of Prevention

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Increasing DV Agencies' Capacity to Serve Survivors with Disabilities

Presenter(s): Molly Nugent & Vanessa Hays

Over the last several years, WEAVE has collaborated with disability-serving agencies in Sacramento County to develop client-led inititatives to improve services for survivors of domestic violence with disabilities. This workshop will give a brief overview on the development of these programs, with an emphasis on the meaningful engagement of survivors with disabilities in the policymaking process. We will also discuss relationship-building, professional training, and accessible communication methods. We will then engage in an interactive activity with the audience to discuss best practices and strategies for shifting power and framing an approach that centers around survivors of domestic violence with disabilities.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Disrupting the Organizational Status Quo

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Meet Me at the Intersection: Including Anti-Oppression Work in Prevention

Presenter(s): Tonjie Reese

During this session, participants will gain a deep understanding of how identity affirmation and personal agency fits into prevention education work. This will be done by taking a deep dive into intersectionality, exploring what it means to be an adult ally, and partaking in activities that can be used in all communities. Activities will focus on self-reflection, improving the gender box activity, and being adult supportive v adult driven. This workshop will address diverse perspectives, promote community collaboration, and reflect on the needs of all young people by encouraging prevention educators and advocates to center identity affirmation their work. Young people are increasingly becoming more vocal about their desires, and the world they want to live. As adults, we should focus on the power that exist within young people, and use that power to encourage change. This workshop will use hands on activities that can be duplicated and inserted into pre-existing curriculum.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Working Upstream: The Many Facets of Prevention

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Partnering for Survivors: The Los Angeles DV Homeless Services Coalition

Presenter(s): Elizabeth Eastlund & Amy Turk

The workshop will provide attendees with: strategies to connect with homeless service providers and advocacy groups in their community; a deep understanding of policy advocacy with regards to housing and homeless issues at the local, state and national levels; approaches to ensure the voices of survivors are represented in this critical work

The presenters will share the results of a Survivor Focus Group Report that provides Survivor Solutions to Program and Systems Change. The DVHS Coalition works with National Partners, including Safe Housing Partnership, to learn best practices from other communities across the country. Attendees will have an opportunity to share their successes and challenges in partnering with housing and homeless service providers.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Holistic Services: Quality of Life and Well Being for Survivors

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Pets are Family: Creating Pet Friendly Programs

Presenter(s): Laurel Meleski & Rachel Stevens

Research shows that many people will not leave an abusive situation if they have to leave a pet behind. They know that their pet might be injured or used against them, and pets are often an important emotional support for the survivor and their children. RedRover has expanded the grants we offer to help domestic violence shelters create pet-friendly programs tailored to their shelter and their community. We'll discuss how Domestic Violence shelters can create pet-friendly programs, how they can collaborate with other organizations in the community for support, and how RedRover can help with grants and advice. We'll also discuss the advice that domestic violence shelters who currently offer pet-friendly programs can offer. Together we can remove pet safety as a barrier that is keeping people from escaping abuse.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Holistic Services: Quality of Life and Well Being for Survivors

Tuesday, March 12th - 9:50am - 11:05pm


Reach Across the Aisle: How 2 Feminists Worked with Christian Conservatives

Presenter(s): Connie Chung Joe & Sunny Kim

DV movement is progressive, feminist-based and survivor-centered. In contrast, many Christian churches are conservative, patriarchal, and family-focused. So how do DV advocates reach across the aisle to work with a group whose values and priorities are so disparate from our own?
In this workshop, KFAM will describe:
Our partnership with Korean churches over 7+ years;
The opinions Christian conservatives had about DV providers; and
How that's evolved today through specific steps we took to build trust and understanding with them.

We'll candidly share the compromises we made to work with them when their values often conflicted with our own around social justice, women's rights, etc. We'll prepare you for the impact this has had on our survivor-centered DV agency and progressive DV advocates.

In breakouts, you will discuss: Is it worth it? What are the costs? What are you not willing to compromise on? How far are you willing to go to reach across the aisle?

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Shining Light on Quiet Domestic Violence Narratives

Monday, March 11th - 3:40pm - 4:55pm


Removing the Margins: Anti-Racism Work for Reducing Domestic Violence

Presenter(s): Kate Vander Tuig & Orchid Pusey

As a movement, we have seen how intimate violence has been used as a tool to uphold white supremacy and other forms of systemic oppression. In this workshop, we will be using a series of three newly developed videos to discuss the importance of integrating anti-racism and oppression frameworks into anti-violence advocacy, as well as identify specific strategies participants can consider enhancing their anti-racism work. Sharing the wisdom and stories of survivors and advocates, these videos serve as an invitation to begin engaging in these discussions and system changes as an advocate or as an organization. Participants can use these videos and accompanying discussions, prompts and resources as a tool spark change in their own organizations. These videos were developed in partnership with Vanessa Timmons, Amita Swadhin, Kelly Miller, Lidia Salazar, Zoe Flowers, Pablo Espinoza, Lisa Fujie Parks, Debra Ward, Maria Limon, Jose Juan Lara, Amina White, and Orchid Pusey.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Working Upstream: The Many Facets of Prevention

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm


Safer Sexting: Not Your Parents' Sexting Talk

Presenter(s): Sarah Hyde

Most health educators and adult allies are teaching youth an abstinence only model about sexting - they say, "Just don't do it." This gives youth no opportunity to be real about their experiences, or to learn harm reduction strategies should they choose to sext. Many youth face relationship harm in the context of sexting, whether that's a partner exposing a nude image as blackmail, threatening to expose a nude image or pressuring their partner to send a nude image. SAVE's youth services program and executive director partnered with over 30 youth, parents, and local service providers to create a curriculum called "Safer Sexting" to give youth an opportunity to learn about consent, boundaries, risks and benefits of sexting, healthy community responses to sexting, and how to get help. This workshop will take participants through the curriculum and equip service providers to engage in sex positive, harm reduction education, prevention, and interventions with youth.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Working Upstream: The Many Facets of Prevention

Tuesday, March 12th - 11:25am - 12:40pm


Stepping into cultural inclusiveness and equity in the DV field

Presenter(s): Gayle Guest-Brown & Mercedes Tune

It is designed to create a brave space to have Courageous Conversations about racial inequalities and its manifestations in the DV field, and A Call to Action centering WOC as a proxy for the last girl.

In order to broaden the understanding of who the last girl is, we will connect the causal links between historic lines - colonialism, genocide, and slavery- to present inequities. We'll look at the status of WOC in CA.

We will invite the audience to hold space to review outcomes produced by racial inequality.

We'll create a highly experiential, brave space in multicultural Sister Circle, and we will offer two tools to mitigate the disparities and to contribute to creating inclusiveness and equity in the field: Allyship and Liberated Gatekeeping.

Methodology - The workshop will be comprised of three sections with multiple elements, Silent Wall & Reflection, Circle, Video and Small Groups work; based in Partnership Values of Beloved Community, Equity and Bravery.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Transforming and Leveling Power Differentials

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm


The Impacts of DV on American Indian infants and children

Presenter(s): Connie Reitman-Solas

Research shows that throughout history American Indian (AI) people have suffered various forms of trauma due to colonization. The violence that AI people have experienced is historical trauma that is repeated throughout generations of AI families if not addressed and healed from. Therefore, the effects of child abuse and domestic violence exposure in childhood on adolescents is internalizing and externalizing behaviors. Data for this research for example was with AI youth addressing outcomes of family violence and resilience in individuals and families. Results show that child abuse, domestic violence, and both in combination (i.e., dual exposure) increase a child's risk for internalizing and externalizing outcomes in adolescence. When accounting for risk factors associated with additional stressors in the family and surrounding environment, only those children with dual exposure had an elevated risk of the tested outcomes compared to non-exposed youth.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Our Work in the Margins: Now More than EVER!

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm


The Red Women Rising Project: Implementing Culturally Responsive Services

Presenter(s): April McGill & Cibonay Jimenez

CCUIH is excited to announce Year III of our Red Women Rising Project, which continues to build on culturally responsive domestic violence services for Urban Indians in California, while increasing partnerships between Urban Indian health organizations, domestic violence service providers and traditional healing experts.

For Year II, CCUIH has began strong partnership meetings with AIAN DV experts made up from staff from Inter Tribal Council of California (ITCC), Strong Hearted Women's Coalition (SHWC), and the WEAVE/SNAHC partnership. ITCC provides AIAN DV services statewide, through a network of DV advocates and volunteers. SHWC runs the only AIAN DV shelter in California, advocates on AIAN DV issues at the federal level, and provides T/TA to tribes, UIHO's and Indian health organizations statewide. Our goal is to bring all AIAN DV experts together and learn from each other on how to better serve the AIAN communities in California.

Workshop level: Advanced

Track: Shining Light on Quiet Domestic Violence Narratives

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm


The Role of Technology in Addressing GBV and Disaster Relief

Presenter(s): Haleema Bharoocha & Nia Mitchell

The way we address GBV will fundamentally change because of 1. the rise of technology and 2. impacts of climate change. In October of 2018, the United Nations announced that we are facing a catastrophic 1.5-degree rise in global temperature occurring over the next 12 years. This rise is a key factor in the increasing intensity and rate of natural disasters like heat waves and hurricanes. GBV increases during natural disasters. Technological advancements have led to the creation of digital tools that play key roles in both disaster relief and ending GBV. However, women often lack access to those tools, because they have disproportionately lower rates of smartphone ownership and internet access as compared to their male counterparts. This workshop will address how patriarchial systems perpetuate climate change and GBV, offer an intersectional analysis of these issues, and their causes, and propose solutions based thinking for adapting to our changing environment.

Workshop level: Introductory

Track: Holistic Services: Quality of Life and Well Being for Survivors

Monday, March 11th - 2:05pm - 3:20pm